• Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Gyeongheungsa Temple – 경흥사 (Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Gyeongheungsa Temple is located in southern Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the northeast of Donghaksan (602.7 m). It’s believed by some that Gyeongheungsa Temple was first founded in 659 A.D. by the monk Hyegong-hwasang. But the evidence is rather thin to support this theory. Another theory states that Gyeongheungsa Temple was first founded in 1637. And later, the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” was enshrined at the temple in 1644. The temple would be rebuilt in 1719 and further rebuilt in 1897. In the 1990s, the “Wooden Seated Sakyamuni Buddha Triad of Gyeongheungsa Temple” was examined to reveal a written message on the clothing of Seokgamoni-bul (The…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Bogwangsa Temple – 보광사 (Cheongsong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History There are numerous Bogwangsa Temples in Korea, but this Bogwangsa Temple is located in Cheongsong, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the north of Mt. Bogwangsan (435.1 m). While there’s no clear evidence as to when Bogwangsa Temple was first founded, it’s believed to have been first established in 668 A.D. by the famed monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.). However, this date seems to be unreliable, as Uisang-daesa was still studying in Tang Dynasty China (618–690, 705–907 A.D.) until 671 A.D. According to the “Yeojidoseo,” or “Collected Chronicles and Maps, 1765” in English, “Bogwangsa Temple is located five li (two kilometres) south of the local administrative office. The temple is a guardian temple…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong – 구미 황상동 마애여래입상 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    The History and Design of the Image The “Rock-carved Standing Buddha in Hwangsang-dong” is located in northeastern Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do hidden behind a row of factory buildings. These factories shield people from being able to see this high relief image of Amita-bul (The Buddha of the Western Paradise) from the road. It’s presumed that this high relief carving of a standing Amita-bul was first made around the turn of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) and Goryeo (918-1392) periods in the 10th century. The relief is carved on the southeastern surface of a huge rock cliff. The image measures an impressive 7.3 metres in height. In addition to both its age and height,…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Yeonmisa Temple – 연미사 (Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Yeonmisa Temple, which means “Swallow Tail Temple” in English, is located in northern Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. It’s believed that the temple was first founded in 634 A.D. by the monk Myeongdeok and then rebuilt twice. After its founding, very little is known about the temple’s history. During the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), the area that Yeonmisa Temple is located was a popular place for officials traveling in the area between provinces. This area is now known as Jebiwon. During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the temple fell into disrepair. It was only later, and during Japanese Colonial Rule (1910-45), that Yeonmisa Temple was rebuilt in 1918. The temple was rebuilt on…

  • Jeollanam-do

    Cheonjaam Hermitage – 천자암 (Suncheon, Jeollanam-do)

    Hermitage History Cheonjaam Hermitage, which is located on the Songgwangsa Temple grounds in western Suncheon, Jeollanam-do, is situated near the peak of Mt. Cheonjaamsan (757.4 m) to the southwest. It’s believed that the hermitage was first established by Damdang-guksa (1226-1293), who was the ninth of sixteen “guksa” (national preceptors) from Songgwangsa Temple. Additionally, he was a prince of Goryeo (918-1392). After its founding, the monk Seolmuk reconstructed the hermitage in 1633. Later, it would be rebuilt, once more, this time by the monk Jiwon in 1730. In 1740, the Manse-ru Pavilion was built. In 1882, the Chilseong-gak Hall was built. And in 1939, the Geumdang Hall was built. Construction on…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Haeunsa Temple – 해운사 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Haeunsa Temple is located on the northern part of Mt. Geumosan (976.5 m) in western Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do. It’s believed that Haeunsa Temple was first founded by the famed monk Doseon-guksa (827-898 A.D.) at the end of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). When the temple was first established, it was named Daehyeolsa Temple. During the late Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), the Korean official-scholar Gil Jae (1353-1419) of the Goryeo Dynasty and early Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) hid in this area and planted bamboo. While hiding at the temple, he is said to have learned Taoism, as well. Sadly, and during the Imjin War (1592-98), all the buildings at the temple were destroyed.…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Bongamsa Temple – 봉암사 (Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Bongamsa Temple is located to the south of Mt. Huiyangsan (996.4 m) in northwestern Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Bongamsa Temple was first founded in 879 A.D. by the monk Jijeung (824-882 A.D.), who was also known as Doheon-guksa. Bongamsa Temple was the main temple of the Huiyangsan School, which was one of the nine branches of Korean Seon Buddhism known as the “Seonjong Gusan – Nine Mountain Seon Sects.” These Seon sects were established at the end of the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.) and the start of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). It’s believed that the temple was named Bongamsa Temple in 881 A.D. by King Heongang of…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Jeokcheonsa Temple – 적천사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Jeokcheonsa Temple is located to the north of Mt. Osan (514.6 m) in southern Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Jeokcheonsa Temple was originally a cave temple first founded by Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.) in 664 A.D. The temple was later rebuilt in 828 A.D. by the monk Simji, who was the third son of King Heungdeok of Silla (826-836 A.D.). In 1175, the monk Jinul (1158-1210) rebuilt Jeokcheonsa Temple. Additionally, at the end of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) and the start of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), some five hermitages would be built on the Jeokcheonsa Temple grounds, as well. During the Imjin War (1592-98), the temple would be destroyed by the invading…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daesansa Temple – 대산사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Daesansa Temple is located to the northeast of Mt. Cheonwangsan (619.3 m) in western Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. According to the “Woleunsan Daesansa Sajeok – 월은산 대산사 사적,” which is the only historical record about Daesansa Temple, the temple was first established in 830 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). But as you can tell from the time that Wonhyo-daesa actually lived, this makes the construction of the temple by Wonhyo-daesa a little suspicious. With this in mind, when the temple was first established, it was named Yongbongsa Temple. During the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), Ilyeon (1206-1289) was the head monk of Yongbongsa Temple. It was at this time…

  • Gyeongsangnam-do

    Janguisa Temple – 장의사 (Goseong, Gyeongsangnam-do)

    Temple History Janguisa Temple is located on the eastern slopes of Mt. Munamsan (459.4 m) in eastern Goseong, Gyeongsangnam-do. Janguisa Temple was first founded by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.) in 642 A.D. After its founding, nothing is known about the temple’s history. In 1885, Janguisa Temple was destroyed by flooding. The temple was rebuilt in 1891 in its current location, which is lower on the mountain than its original location. The temple was rebuilt, once more, by the monk Hobong in 1920. And the temple we know today was rebuilt in the early 1960s. Janguisa Temple is home to one provincial treasure, it’s the “Goseong Janguisa Stone Gwanseeum-bosal…