• Jeollabuk-do,  Templestay

    Templestay – Geumsansa Temple (Gimje, Jeollabuk-do)

    Introduction to Temple Geumsansa Temple is located in Gimje, Jeollabuk-do, and it was first built in either 599 A.D. or 600 A.D. When it was first built, it was rather unassuming; however, in 762 A.D., and under the guidance of the monk Jinpyo (8th century), Geumsansa Temple was rebuilt and expanded over a six year period. Geumsansa Temple underwent numerous changes during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). Then during the Joseon Dynasty and the Imjin War (1592-1598), Geumsansa Temple was destroyed by the invading Japanese after the temple was used as a training ground for the Righteous Army. The restoration of Geumsansa Temple began in 1601, and it was completed over…

  • Busan

    Geumsansa Temple – 금산사 (Gijang-gun, Busan)

    Temple History Geumsansa Temple is located in Gijang-gun, Busan, and it belongs to the Jogye-jong Order. The temple was first established in October, 1990 by the monk Geumsan; and hence, where the temple gets its name. In January, 2004, the temple added a large Reclining Buddha image inside the main hall. Also, and it’s unclear of the connection between the two, but the Sanshin-do (Mountain Spirit Mural) of Geumsansa Temple is Busan Cultural Heritage Property #85 as of 2015. The painting of Sanshin dates back to 1856. And it’s a wonderful example of a mid-19th century shaman painting. It’s unclear of the paintings present location. Temple Layout You first approach…

  • Artwork

    Universal Salvation Pavilion – Boje-ru: 보제루

    Boje-ru Pavilion Design The fifth and final entry gate at a Korean Buddhist temple is actually a pavilion/entry gate. This pavilion/entry gate is sometimes referred to as the Boje-ru Pavilion, which means “Universal Salvation Pavilion,” in English. The pavilion is a two-story structure that is positioned between the Beopdang (main hall) and the Bulimun Gate (The Gate of Non-Duality). Specifically, Boje means “universal salvation,” which is a reference to the casting of a net across Samgye (Realm of Desire), and the desire in Mahayana Buddhism to rescue all sentient beings. “Ru,” on the other hand, simply means “pavilion” in Chinese characters (Hanja). Typically, the first story of the structure acts…

  • Jeollabuk-do

    Geumsansa Temple – 금산사 (Gimje, Jeollabuk-do)

    Temple History Geumsansa Temple, which means “Golden Mountain Temple,” in English is located in a flat river valley on the western slopes of Moaksan Provincial Park in Gimje, Jeollabuk-do. Geumsansa Temple was first established in either 599 or 600 A.D., depending on the source, during the reign of King Beop of Baekje (r. 599-600 A.D.). When it was first built, it was rather unassuming and nothing like it is today. It wasn’t until 762 A.D., under the guidance of the monk Jinpyo (8th century), that Geumsansa Temple was rebuilt. Geumsansa Temple was rebuilt over a six year period. Numerous buildings at the temple were rebuilt at this time including the…