• Gyeongsangnam-do

    Dasolsa Temple – 다솔사 (Sacheon, Gyeongsangnam-do)

    Temple History Dasolsa Temple is located to the east of Mt. Bongmyeongsan (407.1 m) in Sacheon, Gyeongsangnam-do. Dasolsa Temple was first constructed in 503 A.D. by the Indian monk Yeongi, who also founded Hwaeomsa Temple in 544 A.D. Originally, the temple was called Yeongaksa Temple. The temple would change its name to Dasolsa Temple in 636 A.D. Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) would then change the temple’s name to Yeongbongsa Temple in 676 A.D. Over a hundred years later, the temple would change its name, once more, during the reign of King Gyeongmun of Silla (r. 861-875 A.D.) by the famed monk Doseon-guksa (826-898 A.D.). The temple was repaired in 1326 to…

  • Gangwon-do

    Geodonsa-ji Temple Site – 거돈사지 (Wonju, Gangwon-do)

    Temple Site History The Geodonsa-ji Temple Site is located to the southwest of Mt. Hyeongyesan (535.6 m) in Wonju, Gangwon-do. It’s believed that the temple was first constructed around the 9th century during late Silla (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). It was later expanded and repaired in the early Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). And the temple was kept operational until the early Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). During archaeological work on the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site, a middle gate, pagodas, a main hall, a lecture hall, monks’ dorms, and wide corridors were all discovered. Geodonsa Temple was the headquarters for Beopan-jong Order, which was a fusion of Seon Buddhism and Hwaeom Buddhism. It was…

  • Jeollanam-do,  Templestay

    Templestay – Baegyangsa Temple (Jangseong, Jeollanam-do)

    Introduction to Temple Baegyangsa Temple is located in Naejangsan National Park in Jangseong, Jeollanam-do. It’s located in a picturesque valley between Mt. Daegaksan (529.8 m) to the southeast and Mt. Baegamsan (741.2 m) to the northwest. Baegyangsa Temple was first founded in 632 A.D. during the Baekje Kingdom (18 B.C. – 660 A.D.). When the temple was first constructed, it was named Baegamsa Temple. Later, and during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), it was renamed to Jeongtosa Temple in 1034. The temple would change its name, once more, in 1350 to that of Gakjinguksa Temple. Finally in 1574, when the temple was rebuilt, it was also renamed with the current name…

  • Jeollanam-do,  Templestay

    Templestay – Hwaeomsa Temple (Gurye, Jeollanam-do)

    Introduction to Temple Hwaeomsa Temple is located in Gurye, Jeollanam-do on the very south-western edge of Jirisan National Park. Hwaeomsa Temple means “Flower Garland Temple” in English, which is in reference to the Flower Garland Sutra. The temple was first established in 544 A.D. by the monk Yeongi-josa, who might have been from India. The temple was later expanded by Jajang-yulsa (590-648 A.D.) in 643 A.D. And it was further expanded by the monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.), during the reign of King Munmu of Silla (r. 661-681 A.D.). Later, and in 875 A.D., Doseon-guksa (827-898 A.D.) expanded the temple, once more. Throughout the years, Hwaeomsa Temple has undergone numerous rebuilds…

  • Chungcheongnam-do

    Anguksa-ji Temple Site – 안국사지 (Dangjin, Chungcheongnam-do)

    Temple Site History The Anguksa-ji Temple Site is located in Dangjin, Chungcheongnam-do to the east of Mt. Eunbongsan, which is also known as Mt. Anguksan. It’s believed that Anguksa Temple was first constructed sometime during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). The temple was later destroyed sometime during the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). Later, it was rebuilt by the monk Yong-jun in 1929; however, the temple was closed not long after and has remained abandoned ever since. During a 2003 excavation conducted on the site, a roof tile was discovered with the writing “Taeping” written on it. “Taeping” is a reference to the named used during the reign of Emperor Shengzong (r. 982-1031)…

  • Jeollabuk-do,  Templestay

    Templestay – Seonunsa Temple (Gochang, Jeollabuk-do)

    Introduction to Temple Seonunsa Temple, which is located in Gochang, Jeollabuk-do, means “Seon [Zen] Cloud Temple” in English. The name of the temple implies how profound wisdom is found by staying in the clouds in the boundlessness of Seon meditation. Seonunsa Temple was first built in 577 A.D. by the monk Geumdan-seonsa of the Baekje Kingdom (18 B.C. to 660 A.D.). Seonunsa Temple would eventually fall into disrepair until it was restored by the monk Hyojeong-seonsa in 1354. Seonunsa Temple would be rebuilt again in 1474 by the monk Haengjo-seonsa. The temple would continue to expand until the Imjin War (1592-1598). Seonunsa Temple was completely destroyed by fire during the second invasion of the…

  • Jeollanam-do

    Yeongiam Hermitage – 연기암 (Gurye, Jeollanam-do)

    Hermitage History Yeongiam Hermitage is located in the far northern part of the Hwaeomsa Temple grounds in Gurye, Jeollanam-do. Yeongiam Hermitage is one of eight hermitages at Hwaeomsa Temple. Yeongiam Hermitage is named after the Indian monk that first founded Hwaeomsa Temple in 544 A.D., Yeongi-josa. The hermitage is believed to have first been built during the Baekje Kingdom (18 B.C. – 660 A.D.). Yeongiam Hermitage was then destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-1598) in 1592. The hermitage was only recently rebuilt in 1989. And it continues to expand to the present day. Hermitage Layout Making your way up to Yeongiam Hermitage and past the hermitage parking lot, you’ll be…

  • Jeollabuk-do,  Templestay

    Templestay – Naesosa Temple (Buan, Jeollabuk-do)

    Introduction to Temple Naesosa Temple, which means “Come Revive Temple” in English, is located in Buan, Jeollabuk-do. Naesosa Temple is located just south of Gwaneum-bong (Gwanseeum-bosal Peak) in the southern part of Byeonsan Bando National Park. Naesosa Temple was first established in 633 A.D. At that time, two temples were built. They were Daesoraesa Temple and Sosoraesa Temple. Daesoraesa Temple was later destroyed by fire, and all that remained of the two was Sosoraesa Temple. Sosoraesa Temple was later rebuilt in 1633 by Master Cheongmin after all the temple buildings were destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-1598). It was also around this time that the temple was renamed Naesosa Temple. The name of…

  • Jeollanam-do

    Geumjeongam Hermitage – 금정암 (Gurye, Jeollanam-do)

    Hermitage History Geumjeongam Hermitage, which means “Golden Well Hermitage” in English, is located to the east of Hwaeomsa Temple in Gurye, Jeollanam-do. Geumjeongam Hermitage is one of eight hermitages located on the Hwaeomsa Temple grounds. Geumjeongam Hermitage was first founded by the monk Seol-eung in 1562. Later, the Chilseong-gak Hall and the Yosachae (monks’ dorms) were built during the reign of King Gojong of Korea (1863-1907). During the Korean War (1950-1953), most of the hermitages that surrounded Hwaeomsa Temple were destroyed. Of the numerous hermitages that once stood, Geumjeongam Hermitage is one of the few that still remains at Hwaeomsa Temple. Then in 1991, a fire broke out at the…

  • Jeollabuk-do,  Templestay

    Templestay – Geumsansa Temple (Gimje, Jeollabuk-do)

    Introduction to Temple Geumsansa Temple is located in Gimje, Jeollabuk-do, and it was first built in either 599 A.D. or 600 A.D. When it was first built, it was rather unassuming; however, in 762 A.D., and under the guidance of the monk Jinpyo (8th century), Geumsansa Temple was rebuilt and expanded over a six year period. Geumsansa Temple underwent numerous changes during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). Then during the Joseon Dynasty and the Imjin War (1592-1598), Geumsansa Temple was destroyed by the invading Japanese after the temple was used as a training ground for the Righteous Army. The restoration of Geumsansa Temple began in 1601, and it was completed over…