• Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Sudasa Temple – 수다사 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Sudasa Temple is located in northwestern Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do in the southern foothills of Mt. Giyangsan (704.7 m). It’s believed that the temple was first founded by the monk Jingam-guksa (774-850 A.D.), during the reign of King Munseong of Silla (839-857 A.D.), after he saw a white lotus flowering on Mibong Peak. As a result, the temple was originally called Yeonhwasa Temple, which means “Lotus Flower Temple” in English. Eventually, the temple would be destroyed by fire in 976 A.D. only to be rebuilt in 1185 by the monk Gakwon-daesa. In 1273, the temple was destroyed, once more, but this time by floods. And in 1572, the temple was…

  • Busan

    Cheokpanam Hermitage – 척판암 (Gijang-gun, Busan)

    Hermitage History Cheokpanam Hermitage is located to the south of Mt. Bulgwangsan (350.3 m) in northeastern Gijang-gun, Busan. Cheokpanam Hermitage is located on the Jangansa Temple grounds. Cheokpanam Hermitage was first founded in 673 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). Initially, the temple was known as Damunsa Temple. According to a legend written in the “Songgoseungjeon – 僧傳 宋,” there were 1,000 Chinese monks worshiping at Taehwasa Temple in Tang China (618–690, 705–907 A.D.). They were in danger of being buried at the temple because of torrential rain and the potential for a landslide. Upon realizing this, and as Wonhyo-daesa was putting his hands together during a pre-ceremony, he saw…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Unsuam Hermitage – 운수암 (Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Unsuam Hermitage is located on the Jikjisa Temple grounds in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The hermitage is beautifully located near the peak of Mt. Hwangaksan (1,111.3 m), and to the west of Jikjisa Temple. It’s unclear when the hermitage was first founded. Unsuam Hermitage is one of seven hermitages on the Jikjisa Temple grounds. Hermitage Layout From the hermitage parking lot, you’ll follow the road up towards the hermitage grounds first to the left and then to the right. The first building to greet you at Unsuam Hermitage are the monks’ dorms and the hermitage’s kitchen. Beyond this, you’ll find the main hall at the hermitage. The exterior of the…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Myeongjeokam Hermitage – 명적암 (Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Myeongjeokam Hermitage is located on the Jikjisa Temple grounds in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The hermitage is beautifully located to the east of Mt. Hwangaksan (1,111.3 m), and to the west of Jikjisa Temple. It’s unclear when the hermitage was first founded. Myeongjeokam Hermitage is one of seven hermitages on the Jikjisa Temple grounds. Hermitage Layout To get to Myeongjeokam Hermitage from Jikjisa Temple, you’ll need to follow one of several hermitage roads, until it breaks-off into the road that leads up to Myeongjeokam Hermitage. Finally, you’ll find a path that is shaded by rows of mature trees. Eventually, a crowning two-story pavilion will appear. This is the first indication…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daejeoksa Temple – 대적사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Daejeoksa Temple is located in northern Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the west of Mt. Ansan (501.7 m). Daejeoksa Temple was first founded in 876 A.D. by the monk Bojo Chejing (804-880 A.D.), who shouldn’t be confused with the more famous Bojo-guksa (1158-1210). The temple was later rebuilt by the monk Boyang during the early part of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). Daejeoksa Temple would eventually be destroyed by fire during the Imjin War (1592-98) in 1592. The temple was extensively repaired by the monk Seonghae in 1689. The temple would be repaired, again, in 1754 and 1939. And more recently, and starting in the 1970s, Daejeoksa Temple has undergone repairs…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Yongsusa Temple – 용수사 (Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Yongsusa Temple is located on the southern slopes of Mt. Yongdusan (664.6 m) in the very northern part of Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Yongsusa Temple was first founded in 1181 during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). According to one story, there was a temple in the area before Yongsusa Temple was first built, but all that remained of this site was the foundation after several fires destroyed the former temple. When the governor of the region built Gakhwasa Temple, as well as several other temples on the south side of the old Yongsusa Temple Site in 1146, a monk, who had a close relationship with the royal family, asked for a…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Sujeongsa Temple – 수정사 (Cheongsong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Sujeongsa Temple is a popular name for temples in Korea. However, this Sujeongsa Temple is located in Cheongsong, Gyeongsangsangbuk-do to the southwest of Mt. Bibongsan (670.9 m). It’s believed that the temple was first founded by the monk Naong Hyegeun (1320-1376) during the reign of King Gongmin of Goryeo (r. 1351-1374). And the reason that Naong named the temple Sujeongsa Temple, which means “Crystal Temple” in English, is because the surrounding scenery around the temple was beautiful. Additionally, the spring water that flowed from the mountains and into the valley where Sujeongsa Temple was located was crystal clear. Originally, Sujeongsa Temple was eight or nine buildings in size.…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Jirimsa Temple – 지림사 (Bonghwa, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Jirimsa Temple is located to the east of Mt. Hogolsan (283.4 m) in northern Bonghwa, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Historic records indicate that there was once a great temple called “Hanjeol” in Bukji-ri, Bonghwa during the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). Purportedly, the main temple was surrounded by 27 smaller temples, where about 500 monks lived. There’s also a temple legend surrounding the founding of neighbouring Chukseosa Temple and Jirimsa Temple. According to this legend, the head monk at Jirimsa Temple saw an auspicious light emanating from the side of the mountain. The head monk then told Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) who was visiting Jirimsa Temple at the time. When…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daegoksa Temple – 대곡사 (Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Daegoksa Temple is located to the east of Mt. Bibongsan (579.3 m) in northwestern Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. There are no specific records about when Daegoksa Temple was first founded; however, it’s generally assumed to have first been built in 1368 to honour the Indian monk Jigong (1289-1363) who traveled extensively for many years in parts of China (Yuan) and Korea (Goryeo) to help teach Buddhism. As a result, the temple was originally named Daeguksa Temple to commemorate the travels of Jigong to these two great countries. Originally, there were nine hermitages at the temple, as well. The temple and eight of the hermitages would later be destroyed in 1592…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Juwolsa Temple – 주월사 (Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Juwolsa Temple is located in eastern Uiseong, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the north of Mt. Dochiksan (257.8 m). It’s believed that the temple was first established during the reign of King Sinmun of Silla (r. 681-692 A.D.). It isn’t known exactly when Juwolsa Temple was first established. However, it’s believed that the famed monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) first built the temple. The temple was later abandoned during the early part of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). The temple would be rebuilt in the 18th century. At this time, the temple was known as Juwolam Hermitage. It was finally promoted to a temple, Juwolsa Temple, in 1994, when repairs took place on…