• Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Dorisa Temple – 도리사 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Dorisa Temple is located on Mt. Naengsan (694 m) in northern Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The exact date of the temple’s first founding is unknown, however, it’s believed to date back to the fifth century. Additionally, it’s said that Dorisa Temple was the first of its kind in the Silla Kingdom (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). The earliest documentation of the founding of Dorisa Temple is found in the “Shinjeungdongguk Yeoji,” which was compiled in 1530. In this text, it states how the monk Ado-hwasang, who looked similar to King Nulji of Silla (r. 417-458 A.D.), built a temple after seeing that the area was in full bloom even though…

  • Gyeonggi-do

    Seoknamsa Temple – 석남사 (Anseong, Gyeonggi-do)

    Temple History Seoknamsa Temple in Anseong, Gyeonggi-do, not to be confused with the one in Ulsan with the same name, is located to the north of Mt. Seounsan (547.6 m). The temple was first founded in 680 A.D. by the monk Goseung Seokseon. It was later rebuilt by the monk Hyegeo in the early part of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). During the Goryeo Dynasty, hundreds of monks called Seoknamsa Temple home. During the early part of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), Seoknamsa Temple remained intact despite the Confucian-oriented government policies of the Joseon court. While many other temples either fell into disrepair or were completely destroyed by this policy, Seoknamsa Temple…

  • Gyeonggi-do

    Cheongnyongsa Temple – 청룡사 (Anseong, Gyeonggi-do)

    Temple History Cheongnyongsa Temple is located in the southern part of Anseong, Gyeonggi-do in the southwestern foothills of Mt. Seounsan (547.6 m). The temple is presumed to have first been built in 1265 by the monk Zhongfeng Mingben (1263-1323), who was a monk from Yuan China (1271–1368). Originally, the temple was known as Daejangam Hermitage. In 1364, the famed monk Naong (1320-1376) expanded the temple and changed its name to Cheongnyongsa Temple, which means “Blue Dragon Temple” in English. He named the temple as such because he saw a blue dragon descending from the sky from auspicious clouds. During the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), the temple was completely destroyed by fire…

  • Gyeonggi-do

    Yongdeoksa Temple – 용덕사 (Yongin, Gyeonggi-do)

    Temple History Yongdeoksa Temple is located to the west of Mt. Gulamsan (345.8 m) and to the south of Yongin, Gyeonggi-do. Yongdeoksa Temple was first founded 1,300 years ago. It was first built by Yeomgeo-seonsa (?-844 A.D.) during the reign of King Munseong of Silla (r. 839-857 A.D.). It was later rebuilt by Doseon-guksa (826-898 A.D.). According to a temple myth, there were three iron figures that were used to help suppress the strong spirit of the mountain. According to “The Record of Repairing Yongdeoksa Temple,” from “The Record of Contribution of Buddha Food Paddy Field,” which was written in 1914, Yongdeoksa Temple was reconstructed by the monk Seokdam-seonsa in…

  • Gyeonggi-do

    Beopryunsa Temple – 법륜사 (Yongin, Gyeonggi-do)

    Temple History Beopryunsa Temple is located to the east of Mt. Munsusan (403.2 m) in the southeastern part of Yongin, Gyeonggi-do. Beopryunsa Temple, which is also sometimes spelled in English as Beomryunsa Temple, was first conceived of in 1996 when Sangryun dreamed of Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). Ten years later, and in 2005, Beopryunsa Temple was first opened. In 2008, Beopryunsa Temple started to conduct the Temple Stay program at its temple. Some 11 years later, this program was selected as the best Temple Stay program in Korea in 2019. Because the temple is so new, it only consists of one protected property. This is the “Three-Story Stone Pagoda…

  • Gyeongsangnam-do

    Gukilam Hermitage – 국일암 (Hapcheon, Gyeongsangnam-do)

    Hermitage History Gukilam Hermitage is one of a dozen hermitages on the Haeinsa Temple grounds in Hapcheon, Gyeongsangnam-do. As a result, Gukilam Hermitage is beautifully situated in Gayasan National Park. It’s unknown as to when Gukilam Hermitage was first founded. It’s also unknown who first founded the hermitage, as well. The name of the temple derives from the monk Byeokam (1575-1660). Byeokam was born in Boeun, Chungcheongbuk-do. His father died when he was nine years old, and Byeokam became a monk at the age of fourteen under the monk Buhue (1543-1615). When the Imjin War (1592-98) started, Byeokam participated in the war under Buhue. And when the war was over,…

  • Gyeongsangnam-do

    Samseonam Hermitage – 삼선암 (Hapcheon, Gyeongsangnam-do)

    Hermitage History Samseonam Hermitage is located on the Haeinsa Temple grounds in the foothills of Mt. Gayasan (1,433 m) in Hapcheon, Gyeongsangnam-do. Samseonam Hermitage was first founded by the monk Jahong in 1893. It was later rebuilt in 1904 by two monks, Bochan and Jijong. The hermitage was rebuilt, once more, in 1971. Currently, Samseonam Hermitage is a nunnery (bikuni) meditation centre. Hermitage Layout From the hermitage parking lot, you’ll make your way towards a collection of buildings including a storage building to your left. Eventually you’ll pass through an entryway with a signboard that reads “Banya-seonwon – 반야선원 (般若禪院)” on it. To the right of this entryway are a…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Sudoam Hermitage – 수도암 (Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Sudoam Hermitage is a hermitage that belongs to Cheongamsa Temple in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The hermitage is located south of the main temple on Mt. Sudosan (1,317.3 m). Sudoam Hermitage means “Practicing the Way Hermitage” in English. Like Cheongamsa Temple, Sudoam Hermitage was founded by Doseon-guksa (826-898 A.D.) in 859 A.D. Originally, the hermitage belonged to Ssanggyesa Temple. However, throughout the centuries, very little is known about the hermitage’s history after it was first founded. Later, Sudoam Hermitage was completely destroyed by fire in 1894 during the Donghak Peasant Revolution (1894-95). In 1900, the hermitage was rebuilt, which was around the same time as Cheongamsa Temple was rebuilt, as…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Cheongamsa Temple – 청암사 (Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Cheongamsa Temple is located in southern Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the north of Mt. Sudosan (1,317.3 m). The story of Cheongamsa Temple is one of being built, destroyed, and being rebuilt, once more. In total, Cheongamsa Temple was rebuilt a total of five times. The temple was first established in 859 A.D. by the famed monk Doseon-guksa (826-898 A.D.). Little is known about Cheongamsa Temple during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392) and the early part of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). In 1647, the temple was completely destroyed by fire. The temple was later reconstructed by the monks Heojeong-hwasang and Hwanu-daesa. After Cheongamsa Temple was reconstructed, it was nothing more than…

  • Gyeongsangnam-do,  Tongdosa

    Anyangam Hermitage – 안양암 (Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do)

    Hermitage History Anyangam Hermitage is located on the Tongdosa Temple grounds in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do. The name of the hermitage means “Peace Bright Hermitage” in English. It’s unknown as to when the hermitage was first built, but it was repaired in 1295 by the monk Chanin. Anyangam Hermitage was later repaired in 1865, as well. The view that Anyangam Hermitage enjoys of Mt. Yeongchuksan (1,081 m) to the north and Tongdosa Temple to the east is designated as one of the eight most scenic sights on the Tongdosa Temple grounds. Anyangam Hermitage is home to two Gyeongsangnam-do Tangible Cultural Properties. The first is the Shinjung Taenghwa (Guardian Mural) that dates back…