• Chungcheongbuk-do

    Ansimsa Temple – 안심사 (Cheongju, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Temple History Ansimsa Temple is located in southwestern Cheongju in Chungcheongbuk-do. Ansimsa Temple means “Peaceful State of Mind Temple” in English. It’s unclear when this temple was first founded; however, in 775 A.D. the temple changed its name to Ansimsa Temple after the monk Jinpyo-yulsa taught his students here peacefully. This is the same Jinpyo-yulsa that would go on to first build the famed Geumsansa Temple in Gimje, Jeollabuk-do. Later, Ansimsa Temple was rebuilt in 1325 by Wonmyeong-guksa. And it was repaired in 1626 by the monk Songam-daesa. Ansimsa Temple was damaged during the Imjin War in 1592. Later, in 1672, the Daeung-jeon Hall that now currently stands on the…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do

    Mireukdaewon-ji Temple Site – 미륵대원 (Chungju, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Temple Site History The Mireukdaewon-ji Temple Site is located in Woraksan National Park to the northwest of Mt. Poamsan (963.1 m) in Chungju, Chungcheongbuk-do. As the name of the temple site hints at, Mireudaewon-ji Temple Site was built for the worship of Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha). Unfortunately, there is no specific historical records about when the temple was first founded and when it was later destroyed. However, from various archaeological digs and speculation, it’s assumed that the temple was first founded between 901 and 937 A.D., and it was later destroyed in 1230 by the invading Mongols. The temple was later rebuilt after its destruction during the early Joseon Dynasty…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do

    Botapsa Temple – 보탑사 (Jincheon, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Temple History Botapsa Temple is located in Yeongok-ri in Jincheon, Chungcheongbuk-do. The name Yeongok means “lotus flower” in Korean. And the reason that the area is called this is because of the nine peaks surrounding the area, which resembles a lotus flower. As for the temple name, it means “Jewel Pagoda Temple” in English. The present temple is located on a former temple site that was long thought to have been one of the largest temples built during the Three Kingdoms of Korea (18 B.C – 660 A.D.) and through to the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). More recently, and in 1988, a three-story wooden pagoda was built on the temple grounds.…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do

    Yonghwasa Temple – 용화사 (Cheongju, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Temple History Yonghwasa Temple is located in downtown Cheongju, Chungcheongbuk-do next to the Musimcheon Stream. The current Yonghwasa Temple was established in 1902. However, as a result of excavation work conducted by the Cheongju National Museum in 1992 near the Yonghwasa Temple grounds, it was confirmed that a larger temple existed in the area from the late Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). As for the name of the temple, Yonghwasa Temple, it’s related to the belief that Mireuk-bul (The Future Buddha) will be reborn under a dragon flower tree upon his return as a Buddha. Yonghwasa Temple is home to Korean Treasure #985, the Stone Buddhas of Yonghwasa Temple. The seven statues…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do

    Yongamsa Temple – 용암사 (Okcheon, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Temple History Yongamsa Temple in Okcheon, Chungcheongbuk-do is located on the northern side of Mt. Jangryeongam (654.5 m). Yongamsa Temple was first established in 552 A.D. by the monk Uisin. This is the very same monk that would go on to establish the famed Beopjusa Temple one year later in 553 A.D. In a twist, Yongamsa Temple is now a branch temple of Beopjusa Temple. Yongamsa Temple means “Dragon Rock Temple” in English. The temple was named after a dragon-like rock that once resided on the temple grounds. However, the Yongbawi Rock was destroyed by the Japanese, and only a trace of the rock still remains to this day. In…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do

    Yeongguksa Temple – 영국사 (Yeongdong, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Temple History Yeongguksa Temple is located in Yeongdong, Chungcheongbuk-do on the eastern slopes of Mt. Cheontaesan (715.2 m). Yeongguksa Temple dates back to the late Silla (57 B.C. – 668 A.D.) or early Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). One theory states that the temple was first founded during the reign of King Jinpyeong of Silla (r. 579-632 A.D.), while another theory states that it was first constructed during the reign of King Munmu of Silla (r. 661-681 A.D.). Either way, it does seem like that it dates back to around this time period in Korean history. Originally, the mountain where the temple is situated was first called Mt. Jiruksan; however, when…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do

    Sujeongam Hermitage – 수정암 (Boeun-Gun, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Just south-west of the famous Beopjusa Temple in Boeun-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do is Sujeongam Hermitage. And like Beopjusa Temple, it’s beautifully situated in Songnisan National Park. Sujeongam Hermitage is one of twelve hermitages that’s located on the Beopjusa Temple grounds. Sujeongam Hermitage is believed to have been built around the same time as Beopjusa Temple in 553 A.D. by the same monk, Uisin. Unfortunately, very few records remain to tell about the hermitage’s history. However, records do exist stating that the hermitage had shaman shrine halls like the Sanshin-gak (Mountain Spirit Hall), Chilseong-gak (Seven Stars Hall), and Dokseong-gak (Lonely Saint Hall), as well as a Daeseon-bang (Great Meditation Hall) in…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do

    Guinsa Temple – 구인사 (Danyang, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Temple History Guinsa Temple, which means “Salvation of Humanity Temple,” in English is located in the Danyang, Chungcheongbuk-do. Guinsa Temple is situated up a long valley north of the towering Mt. Sobaeksan (1439.6m). The temple was first completed in 1945, when the contemporary founder of the Cheontae-jong Order, Sangwol-wongak, built a small hut from arrowroot vines. During his time here, he received a revelation about the truth of the universe, which is an interpretation of the Lotus Sutra. During the Korean War (1950-53), the temple was destroyed in the fighting. In 1966, Guinsa Temple was renovated and expanded. And in 1967, the Cheontae-jong Order was registered with the Korean government,…

  • Chungcheongbuk-do

    Beopjusa Temple – 법주사 (Boeun-Gun, Chungcheongbuk-do)

    Temple History Beopjusa Temple is situated in Songnisan National Park to the north-east of Boeun-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do. Beopjusa Temple means, “Dharma Residence Temple,” in English. According to the Dongguk-yeoji-seungnam, or the “Survey of the Geography of Korea,” in English, Beopjusa was first founded in 553 A.D. by the monk Uisin. After traveling to India to learn more about Buddhism, Uisan returned to the Korean peninsula with Indian Buddhist scriptures. Carrying these scriptures on a white donkey, he housed these texts at the temple he was to build: Beopjusa Temple. According to historical documents, the famed monk Jinpyo (8th century) returned to the Mt. Songnisan area and marked a location where it…