• Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Manbulsa Temple – 만불사 (Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hello Again Everyone!! Manbulsa Temple, which means “Ten Thousand Buddhas Temple,” in English, is located in south-eastern Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple is scenically located in a valley west of Mt. Manbulsan (275.4m). Manbulsa Temple is a modern temple in the truest sense of the word with its overstated colours and ornate shrine halls. The idea for the construction of Manbulsa Temple dates back to 1981, when the monk Hakseong first thought of building it. However, it’s not until 1992 that the first cornerstone got laid at Manbulsa Temple, which, in effect, started the initial construction of the temple. In February, 1993, the founding monk, Hakseong, brought back a sari (crystallized…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Bogyeongsa Temple – 보경사 (Pohang, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hello Again Everyone!!! Bogyeongsa Temple, which is located in northern Pohang, Gyeongsangbuk-do, is situated to the east of Mt. Cheonryeongsan (774.8 m). Bogyeongsa Temple was first built in 603 A.D., during the reign of King Jinpyeong of Silla (r.579 – 632 A.D.) by the monk Jimyeong. Upon his return to the Silla Kingdom from studying in Tang China, Jimyeong instructed King Jinpyeong of Silla, “If you discover an auspicious site on a famous mountain on the east coast, bury Palmyeong-bogyeong [scripture], and build a Buddhist temple, you will be able to prevent Japanese pirates from invading the Silla Kingdom, and you will unify the Three Kingdoms.” The king was happy…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Unmunsa Temple – 운문사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hello Again Everyone!! Unmunsa Temple, which means “Cloud Gate Temple,” in English, is located in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Specifically, Unmunsa Temple is located to the north of Mt. Gajisan (1240.9m). The temple was first built over a three year period starting in 557 A.D. by the monk Sinseung. At first, it was nothing more than a hermitage. The temple was later rebuilt by the monk Wongwang-guksa (558-638 A.D.) in 608 A.D. Originally, the temple was named Daejakgapsa Temple, or “Great Magpie Hillside Temple,” in English. The monk Boyang-guksa reconstructed Unmunsa Temple in 930 A.D. The founder of the Goryeo Dynasty, King Taejo (r.918-943 A.D.), granted Boyang-guksa 500 gyeol (or 17,000 square…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Chunghyosa Temple – 충효사 (Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hello Again Everyone!! Chunghyosa Temple is located in the very scenic Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. It’s situated to the north of the picturesque Lake Yeongcheon, which is a long and deep lake, and east of Mt. Giryongsan (965.5m). Chunghyosa Temple, which means “Loyalty to Nation Temple,” in English, is located in Chunghyo-ri. This part of Yeongcheon is filled with locations with similar names, too. Chunghyosa Temple was first built in the 1970’s, and it has continued to grow and expand throughout the ensuing decades. Chunghyosa Temple is not apart of the Jogye-jong Buddhist Order, or even the Taego-jong Buddhist Order or the Cheontae-jong Buddhist Order in Korea. Instead, the temple focuses on…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Bongjeongsa Temple – 봉정사 (Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hello Again Everyone!! Bongjeongsa Temple, which is located in Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do, was first built in 672 A.D. However, there is some dispute as to who first built Bongjeongsa Temple. According to the Yangbeopdang-jungsu-gi, the founder of Bongjeongsa Temple is the famed temple builder, Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.). However, according to the Sangnyangmun records of the historic Geukrak-jeon Hall, the temple’s founder was Neungin-daedeok (a disciple of Uisang-daesa). These two aforementioned documents, which document the history of Bongjeongsa Temple, are the two oldest documents regarding the foundation of a temple in Korea. However, it seems as though Neungin-daedeok is the more probable founder of Bongjeongsa Temple. According to the Samguk Yusa (Memorabilia…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Jikjisa Temple – 직지사 (Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hello Again Everyone!! Jikjisa Temple, which means “Finger Pointing Temple,” in English, sits at the base of Mt. Hwangaksan (1111.3m) in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple is scenically located with quiet forests, towering mountain peaks, and rolling streams. According to temple legend, Jikjisa Temple was built in 418 A.D. by the monk Ado-hwasang. There are three theories as to how the temple got its name. The first states that after first seeing the location, Ado-hwasang pointed to a spot on the mountain and said that a large temple should be built at its base. The second story states that in 936 A.D., Master Neungyeo, while reconstructing the temple, instead of using…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Buseoksa Temple – 부석사 (Yeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hello Again Everyone!! Buseoksa Temple, which means “Floating Rock Temple,” in English, is located in Yeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple was first established by the famed monk, Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.), under the royal decree of King Munmu of Silla (r.661-681 A.D.), in 676 A.D. Upon his return from Tang China, Uisang helped spread Buddhism throughout the Korean peninsula. In fact, he used Buseoksa Temple as a base to help spread the message of Hwaeom Buddhism for which he’s renowned. In fact, there’s a famous story about Uisang-daesa’s return to Tang China that was written in the Samguk Yusa. In this story, Uisang met a Chinese woman named lady Seonmyo. Uisang met…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Gatbawi Shrine – 갓바위 (Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hello Again Everyone!! Gatbawi Shrine, which is officially known as the “Stone Seated Buddha at Gwanbong Peak in Palgongsan Mountain, Gyeongsan,” according to the Cultural Heritage Administration of Korea, is located on the famed Mt. Palgongsan (1192.3m) in Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do. In Korean, it’s officially called “Gwanbong Yeorae-jwasang.” Gatbawi is simply a statue on top of Gwanbong Peak (852.9m). Surprisingly, Gatbawi isn’t a National Treasure; instead it’s Korean Treasure #431. The name of the shrine, Gatbawi, is in reference to the name of the bamboo hat, a “Gat,” which is a traditionally worn by men. So Gatbawi is a compound word. It’s a combination of “Gat” with the Korean word “bawi,”…