• Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daesansa Temple – 대산사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Daesansa Temple is located to the northeast of Mt. Cheonwangsan (619.3 m) in western Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. According to the “Woleunsan Daesansa Sajeok – 월은산 대산사 사적,” which is the only historical record about Daesansa Temple, the temple was first established in 830 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). But as you can tell from the time that Wonhyo-daesa actually lived, this makes the construction of the temple by Wonhyo-daesa a little suspicious. With this in mind, when the temple was first established, it was named Yongbongsa Temple. During the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392), Ilyeon (1206-1289) was the head monk of Yongbongsa Temple. It was at this time…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Jukrimsa Temple – 죽림사 (Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Jukrimsa Temple is located in the southern foothills of Mt. Yubongsan (245.1 m) in southern Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. It’s believed that the temple was first built in 809 A.D., but the exact history of the temple is unknown. The only details that we really know is that Jukrimsa Temple was destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-98) and then later rebuilt. There were several reconstructions conducted on the temple during the 1800s. However, during the Korean War (1950-53), the temple was destroyed. After a few decades, Jukrimsa Temple was built, once more, starting in 1990. In the ensuing years, the Daeung-jeon Hall, the Samseong-gak Hall, the Eungjin-jeon Hall, and the…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Bukdaeam Hermitage – 북대암 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Bukdaeam Hermitage is located on the Unmunsa Temple grounds in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Both Bukdaeam Hermitage and Unmunsa Temple are situated to the north of a cauldron of mountains that includes Mt. Unmunsan (1,188 m) and Mt. Gajisan (1,240.9 m). Purportedly, Bukdaeam Hermitage is the first temple or hermitage built on Mt. Unmunsan. However, the exact date of its founding is unknown, but it’s speculated that it was first built in 557 A.D. The hermitage was later reconstructed in 1851 and continues to be repaired and rebuilt to the present day. As for the name of the hermitage, Bukdaeam Hermitage, it gets its name from being built so high…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Jangyuksa Temple – 장육사 (Yeongdeok, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Jangyuksa Temple is located to the south of Mt. Unseosan (519.9 m) in northern Yeongdeok, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple was first constructed by the monk Naong (1320-1376) during the reign of King Gongmin of Goryeo (r. 1351-74). Jangyuksa Temple was later destroyed by a brush fire during the reign of King Sejong (r. 1418-1450). It was at this time that a rather interesting temple myth surrounds the rebuild of Jangyuksa Temple. During this rebuild, a carpenter volunteered to help reconstruct the Daeung-jeon Hall. He did this to help pray for his mother’s recovery. When the construction was almost complete, and there were only the last four pillars left to…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Bulgulsa Temple – 불굴사 (Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Bulgulsa Temple, which means “Buddha Cave Temple” in English, is located to the north of Mt. Muhaksan (588.4 m) in northern Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Purportedly, Bulgulsa Temple was first constructed in 690 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). But this would be rather difficult, since Wonhyo-daesa died in 686 A.D. After its initial founding, very little is known about the temple’s history. However, it’s believed that at the height of its popularity, there were 50 buildings housed at the temple, as well as 12 hermitages directly associated with Bulgulsa Temple up until the mid-Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). In 1723, Bulgulsa Temple was reconstructed; however, it was largely damaged…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Jukjangsa Temple – 죽장사 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Jukjangsa Temple is located below Hyeongje-bong Peak (532 m) in northern Gumi, Gyeongsangnangbuk-do. Jukjangsa Temple is a branch temple of Jikjisa Temple and belongs to the Jogye-jong Order. The temple is believed to have first been founded during the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). However, the exact date of its founding and by whom are unknown. Additionally, very little is known about the temple’s history until the start of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910), when the temple was recorded as Jukjangsa Temple in the 29th volume of the “Sinjeungdong-gukyeoseungram” in 1530. So obviously, Jukjangsa Temple existed and was operating at this time. Eventually, however, the temple would…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Yunpilam Hermitage – 윤필암 (Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Yunpilam Hermitage is located on the Daeseungsa Temple grounds in Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The hermitage is located to the west of Daeseungsa Temple and Mt. Gongdeoksan (914.5 m). According to the “History of Daeseungsa Temple,” Yunpilam Hermitage was first founded in 1380 by the monk Gakgwan. However, the “Record of Yunpilam Hermitage” states that the temple was founded by the monk Gakgwan and Lady Kim, who was the wife of the civil official Kim Deuk-bae. The hermitage was later rebuilt by the monks Seojo and Takjam in 1645. In 1862, there was a fire at the hermitage that completely destroyed all the buildings at Yunpilam Hermitage. In 1885, and…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Hancheonsa Temple – 한천사 (Yecheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Hancheonsa Temple is located in the southern foothills of Mt. Jumasan (516.1 m) in northern Yecheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The temple was first constructed by the monk Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) in 678 A.D. Originally, the temple was called Handaesae Temple, but it was renamed Hancheonsa Temple in the 1900s. According to a temple legend recorded in the “Handaesa Temple Chronicle” (1875), which details the history of the temple, the temple was built by Uisang-daesa. In 676 A.D., and after Uisang-daesa built Buseoksa Temple, the erected pillars used to support structures at the temple continued to fall over. Investigating, Uisang-daesa learned that Mt. Jumasan, which is the southern foot of Mt.…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daeseungsa Temple – 대승사 (Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Daeseungsa Temple is located on Mt. Sabulsan in northern Mungyeong, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Daeseungsa Temple means “Great Vehicle Temple” in English. The temple was first established in 587 A.D., and it was the first Buddhist temple ever built in Mungyeong. Daeseungsa Temple has one of the more interesting origin legends. According to the Samguk Yusa, or “Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms” in English: “To the east of Juknyeong (Bamboo Pass) about one hundred li [500 meters] away, soaring high into the sky, there stands a mountain. In the ninth year of King Jinpyeong of Silla [r. 579-632 A.D.], the year of the monkey (587 A.D.), this mountain shook with a…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Dorisa Temple – 도리사 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Dorisa Temple is located on Mt. Naengsan (694 m) in northern Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The exact date of the temple’s first founding is unknown, however, it’s believed to date back to the fifth century. Additionally, it’s said that Dorisa Temple was the first of its kind in the Silla Kingdom (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). The earliest documentation of the founding of Dorisa Temple is found in the “Shinjeungdongguk Yeoji,” which was compiled in 1530. In this text, it states how the monk Ado-hwasang, who looked similar to King Nulji of Silla (r. 417-458 A.D.), built a temple after seeing that the area was in full bloom even though…