• Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Five-Story Brick Pagoda in Unheung-dong, Andong – 안동 운흥동 오층전탑 (Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Pagoda History The “Five-Story Brick Pagoda in Unheung-dong” is located in central Andong, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the north of a trainyard and to the east of Homeplus. This brick pagoda is believed to have once belonged to Beomninsa Temple, which was written about in a couple of sources. One of these records is the “Dongguk yeoji seungnam – Augumented Survey of the Geography of Korea,” which was written in 1481. Another source is the “Yeonggaji – Record of the Andong Region,” which was written in 1608. According to the “Yeonggaji – Record of the Andong Region,” the brick pagoda at Beomnimsa Temple was a seven-story structure. As a result, historians believe…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Unbuam Hermitage – 운부암 (Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Unbuam Hemritage is one of the several hermitages on the Eunhaesa Temple grounds. It’s located to the east of Mt. Palgongsan (1,192.3 m) in western Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Originally, the hermitage was built by Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) in 711 A.D. However, since Uisang-daesa was already dead when the hermitage was first founded, it’s highly questionable that he was founding any hermitages after his death. What is more likely is that it was first founded in 809 A.D. by the monk Hyecheol-guksa (785-861 A.D.), who was also the founder of Eunhaesa Temple in 809 A.D., as well. As for the reason that the temple is called Unbuam Hermitage, it’s because…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Baekheungam Hermitage – 백흥암 (Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Baekheungam Hermitage is located in Yeongcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do on the temple grounds of Eunhaesa Temple. In fact, if you continue to travel west upon one of the temple roads, you’ll come to Baekheungam Hermitage. Baekheungam Hermitage was first founded in 861 A.D., some fifty years after Eunhaesa Temple was first established in 809 A.D. When the hermitage was first founded, it was called Baekjisa Temple. The original name came from the fact that pine nuts were often found around the hermitage grounds. For several hundred years, there were no records related to Baekheungam Hermitage. It’s not until the early Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) that we learn more about this hermitage.…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Gwaneumseonwon Hermitage – 관음선원 (Sangju, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Gwaneumseonwon Hermitage is located in northwestern Sangju, Gyeongsangbuk-do in the southern foothills of Mt. Noeumsan (725.5 m). Gwaneumseonwon Hermitage is a hermitage directly associated with Namjangsa Temple; as such, it’s located some 300 metres north of Namjangsa Temple on the temple grounds. The name of the hermitage comes from the Bodhisattva Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion). It’s believed that the hermitage was first founded by Jingam as a meditation centre at the end of Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). After its original construction, Gwaneumseonwon Hermitage was rebuilt several times including in 1668 and 1752. Later, and in 1797, the monk Boin rebuilt the Gwaneum-jeon Hall at the hermitage. This…

  • Colonial Korea,  Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Colonial Korea – Buseoksa Temple

    Temple History Buseoksa Temple, which means “Floating Rock Temple” in English, is located in Yeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-do. It’s also one of Korea’s most famous temples. Buseoksa Temple is home to five National Treasures and five additional Korean Treasures. As for the temple itself, Buseoksa Temple was first established by the famed monk, Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.), under the royal decree of King Munmu of Silla (r. 661-681 A.D.), in 676 A.D. There were a few reasons for the Silla Kingdom’s royal support in establishing Buseoksa Temple. The first is that it would help promote the ideas behind Hwaeom (Huayan) Buddhism throughout the Korean Peninsula, and Buseoksa Temple would also act as the base to help spread the…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Namjangsa Temple – 남장사 (Sangju, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Namjangsa Temple is located in northwestern Sangju, Gyeongsangbuk-do in the southern foothills of Mt. Noeumsan (725.5 m). The temple was first established in 832 A.D. after the monk Jingam-seonsa (774-850 A.D.) returned from Tang China (618–690, 705–907 A.D.) in 830 A.D. At this time, when Jingam-seonsa first established the temple, it was known as Jangbaeksa Temple. The temple was reconstructed in 1186 by the monk Gakwon-hwasang and renamed Namjangsa Temple. In 1203, the Geumdang Hall was built, and it was rebuilt, once more, in 1473. Namjangsa Temple was destroyed during the Imjin War (1592-1598). Afterwards, the temple was rebuilt by the monk Jeongsu. The Geumdang Hall was rebuilt…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do,  Templestay

    Templestay – Jikjisa Temple (Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Introduction to Temple Jikjisa Temple is one of the oldest temples in Korea dating back to its founding in 418 A.D. by the monk Ado-hwasang. Jikjisa Temple is located in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do at the base of Mt. Hwangaksan (1111.3 m). The name of the temple means “Finger Pointing Temple” in English, and there are three theories as to how the temple got its name. The first states that after first seeing the location, Ado-hwasang pointed to a spot on the mountain and said that a large temple should be built at its base. The second story states that in 936 A.D., Master Neungyeo, while reconstructing the temple, instead of using…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Five-Story Stone Brick Pagoda in Sanhae-ri – 산해리 오층모전석탑 (Yeongyang, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    The History and Design of the Brick Pagoda The Five-Story Stone Brick Pagoda in Sanhae-ri is located in a small farming village known as Bonggam in Yeongyang, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The pagoda is beautifully placed next to a meandering stream, and it’s believed that the pagoda once stood at a temple from Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.) that has long since disappeared. In fact, very little is known about the pagoda and the temple, and even less is written about it. There are simply no historical records or stories about this former temple. It isn’t until the 1930’s, and through Kyouichi Ariyama’s work, that the Five-Story Stone Brick Pagoda in Sanhae-ri becomes known.…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daebisa Temple – 대비사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Daebisa Temple is located in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Daebisa Temple was first founded in 566 A.D. by the monk Sinseung. Originally, the temple was known as Sojakgapsa Temple. Later, the temple was expanded by the monk Wongwang-guksa (558-638 A.D.) in 600 A.D. It was at this time that the temple was renamed Daebigapsa Temple. As for the name change, it’s slightly unclear as to how it got its name. One theory is that the temple got its name from a Silla Kingdom (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.) queen. Supposedly the temple is named after this queen that stayed at the temple for an extended period of time. Originally, Daebisa…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daeunam Hermitage – 대운암 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Daeunam Hermitage is located on the southern part of the Mt. Yonggaksan (696.8 m) mountain range on Mt. Oryesan in northeastern Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Daeunam Hermitage was first established in 1868 near the end of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). Daeunam Hermitage was eventually destroyed in the 1900s by fire, and it would be rebuilt by Buam-seonsa in 1930. More recently, Daeunam Hermitage has grown in size with the additions of the Sanshin-gak Hall in 1996, the dorms in 1998, and the Gwaneum-jeon Hall in 2000. Daeunam Hermitage is also home to Gyeongsangbuk-do Cultural Property Material #309, which is the Seated Wooden Gwaneum-bosal Statue and Accompanying Relics of Daeunam Hermitage.…