• Gangwon-do,  Templestay

    Templestay – Naksansa Temple (Yangyang, Gangwon-do)

    Introduction to Temple Naksansa Temple is located in Yangyang, Gangwon-do. The name of the temple is in reference to “Botarakgasan,” which is the mythical mountain, Mt. Potalaka, where Gwanseeum-bosal (The Bodhisattva of Compassion) is believed to reside. The temple was first founded in 671 A.D. by Uisang-daesa (625-702 A.D.) upon his return from Tang China (618–690, 705–907 A.D.). Throughout the years, Naksansa Temple has been destroyed by fire numerous times. The temple was first destroyed by the invading Mongols during the 13th century. Throughout the years, Naksansa Temple has been rebuilt and expanded numerous times including during the 15th and 17th centuries. Then in 1953, Naksansa Temple was destroyed during…

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    Gulsansa-ji Temple Site – 굴산사지 (Gangneung, Gangwon-do)

    Temple Site History The Gulsansa-ji Temple Site is located in the southern part of Gangneung, Gangwon-do in Haksan Village. The temple site occupies an impressive 66,698 m2 in size spread out over farmland, but the exact boundaries are unknown. Gulsansa Temple was first founded by National Preceptor Beomil-guksa (810-889 A.D.) in 851 A.D. The temple was one of the Nine Mountain Schools of Seon Buddhism. Here’s a little more about Beomil-guksa. According to a legend, there was a virgin from Haksan Village. One day while drinking water from a bowl, the sun shone down on the bowl. After she drank this water, she became pregnant and eventually delivered a baby…

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    Geodonsa-ji Temple Site – 거돈사지 (Wonju, Gangwon-do)

    Temple Site History The Geodonsa-ji Temple Site is located to the southwest of Mt. Hyeongyesan (535.6 m) in Wonju, Gangwon-do. It’s believed that the temple was first constructed around the 9th century during late Silla (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). It was later expanded and repaired in the early Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). And the temple was kept operational until the early Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). During archaeological work on the Geodonsa-ji Temple Site, a middle gate, pagodas, a main hall, a lecture hall, monks’ dorms, and wide corridors were all discovered. Geodonsa Temple was the headquarters for Beopan-jong Order, which was a fusion of Seon Buddhism and Hwaeom Buddhism. It was…

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    Bohyeonsa Temple – 보현사 (Gangneung, Gangwon-do)

    Temple History Bohyeonsa Temple is located in western Gangneung, Gangwon-do in the foothills of Mt. Daegungsan (1,008.3 m). Purportedly, Bohyeonsa Temple was first established by Jajang-yulsa (598-658 A.D.) in 650 A.D. However, it was while the temple was headed by the monk Nangwon (834-930 A.D.) that the temple began to grow and prosper. Nangwon was a disciple of Beomil-guksa (810-889 A.D.), who first founded the Sagulsanmun Sect of Seon Buddhism in Korea. It was while Nangwon was the head of the temple that it was named Jijangseonwon, and the temple grew to become the head temple of the Sagulsanmun Sect. Eventually, Nangwon would become the State Preceptor during Unified Silla…

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    Deungunsa Temple – 등운사 (Yanggu, Gangwon-do)

    Temple History Deungunsa Temple is located in southern Yanggu, Gangwon-do on the eastern arm of Mt. Samyeongsan (1,198 m). Deungunsa Temple is a modern temple some 21 km from the DMZ. The temple is run by a very friendly nun that did her training at Naewonsa Temple in Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do. The temple is also home to an equally friendly dog named Gwaneum (named after the Bodhisattva of Compassion). Temple Layout From the temple parking lot, you’ll make your way up a set of uneven stairs to the right of the nuns’ dorms. You’ll need to pass to the right of the unpainted Yosachae to gain entry to the main temple…

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    Sutasa Temple – 수타사 (Hongcheon, Gangwon-do)

    Temple History Sutasa Temple in Hongcheon, Gangwon-do is located to the west of Mt. Gongjaksan (887.4 m). Sutasa Temple is located in a bend in the Deokchi-cheon River up Sutasa Valley. Purportedly, the temple was first founded in 708 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (625-686 A.D.). However, since Wonhyo-daesa died in 686 A.D., it’s kind of hard to believe that he would found a temple after his death. And originally, the temple was called Ilwolsa Temple. The temple was renamed in 1568 to Sutasa Temple. The reason for this change is that it’s believed that where Sutasa Temple is located along the foothills of Mt. Gongjaksan that it resembles…

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    Dopiansa Temple – 도피안사 (Cheorwon, Gangwon-do)

    Temple History Dopiansa Temple is located in northern Cheorwon, Gangwon-do some 9 km from the DMZ. Dopiansa Temple was first constructed in 865 A.D. by Doseon-guksa (826-898 A.D.). There’s a legend that an iron statue of Birojana-bul (The Buddha of Cosmic Energy) was to be commissioned. And it was to be enshrined at Anyangsa Temple in Cheorwon. However, the statue disappeared on its way to be enshrined at Anyangsa Temple. Eventually, the iron statue of Birojana-bul was discovered at a previously unknown location on Mt. Hwagaesan. As a result, Doseon-guksa decided, out of respect for Birojana-bul’s choice, to build Dopiansa Temple at the site where the statue was discovered and…

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    Cheongpyeongsa Temple – 청평사 (Chuncheon, Gangwon-do)

    Temple History Cheongpyeongsa Temple is located in a long valley south of Mt. Obongsan (777.9 m) in northern Chuncheon, Gangwon-do. The temple was first constructed in 973 A.D. by the monk Seunghyeon, and it was called Baegamseonwon Temple. The temple was rebuilt in 1068 by the civil official Yi Ui. Later, and in 1089, Yi Ui’s son, Yi Ja-hyeong (1061-1225) would retire as a government official and live at the temple for the next 37 years of his life. During this time, he built several hermitages, pavilions, and ponds. In the mid-16th century, the temple was expanded by the monk Bou, and it was at this time that the temple…

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    Samhwasa Temple – 삼화사 (Donghae, Gangwon-do)

    Temple History Samhwasa Temple is located in Donghae, Gangwon-do. More specifically, Samhwasa Temple is located up Mureung Valley north of Mt. Dutasan (1357 m). Originally, the temple was located 1.3 km to the east. In 1977, Samhwasa Temple was relocated to its current location because its former location was a mining area used for cement factories. Samhwasa Temple is now located on the former site for Jungdaesa Temple. There is a legend related to the site of Samhwasa Temple. According to this legend, there is a place called “Hoamso.” It’s said that there was a tiger running around Mt. Dutasan and Mt. Cheongaksan. The tiger fell into the valley between…

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    Geonbongsa Temple – 건봉사 (Goseong, Gangwon-do)

    Temple History Geonbongsa Temple is located in Goseong, Gangwon-do some 8 km from the DMZ. Geonbongsa Temple is part of the Mt. Geumgangsan (1,638 m) mountain range at its southern tip. Also, and of note, the DMZ divides the mountain range. The temple is also commonly referred to as Geumgangsan Geonbongsa Temple. Geonbongsa Temple was first founded in 520 A.D., and it was initially named Wongaksa Temple. The temple was then later rebuilt in 758 A.D. by the monk Baljing (?-785 A.D.). In fact, Baljing chanted Buddhist prayers for 10,000 days to be reborn in the Western Paradise, or Jeongto in Korean. Purportedly, this was the origin of this ceremony…