• Busan

    Seongwangsa Temple – 선광사 (Sasang-gu, Busan)

    Temple History Seongwangsa Temple is located in Sasang-gu, Busan in the western foothills of Mt. Baekyangsan (641.3 m). It’s unclear as to when the temple was first built, but it’s one of the 973 traditional Buddhist temples in Korea. Also, it’s a temple that belongs to the Beophwa-jong Buddhist Order. Recently, Seongwangsa Temple changed its name from Yaksasa Temple to Seongwangsa Temple to differentiate it from the neighbouring Yaksuam Hermitage. In February, 2011, Seongwangsa Temple had a ceremony to enshrine the large Maae Buddha at the top of the temple grounds. Temple Layout You first make your way up a pretty treacherous road to get to Seongwangsa Temple. Eventually arriving…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daeyulsa Temple – 대율사 (Gunwi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Daeyulsa Temple is a modern temple that’s located near farmer’s fields in southern Gunwi, Gyeongsangbuk-do. Daeyulsa Temple is located to the north of Mt. Palgongsan (1,192.3 m). During Daeyulsa Temple’s initial construction in 1972, the “Stone Standing Buddha in Daeyul-ri, Gunwi” was discovered. The only Korean Treasure located at the compact temple grounds at Daeyulsa Temple is the “Stone Standing Buddha in Daeyul-ri, Gunwi,” which is Korean Treasure #988. This standing image of the Buddha dates back to Unified Silla (668-935 A.D.). It’s believed that there used to a large Buddhist temple in Daeyul-ri Village in Gunwi that housed the “Stone Standing Buddha in Daeyul-ri, Gunwi.” Temple Layout…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Seonggulsa Temple – 성굴사 (Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Seonggulsa Temple is located in southern Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the northeast of Mt. Donghaksan (602.7 m). Formerly, the temple was known as Mansusa Temple. The temple, including the caves, seem to be modern in construction. Temple Layout You first approach Seonggulsa Temple up a long valley. On the eastern banks of the narrow stream is the eccentric Seonggulsa Temple. The first thing to greet you at the temple is a beautiful three metre tall stone statue dedicated to Yaksayeorae-bul (The Buddha of Medicine, and the Buddha of the Eastern Paradise). To the left are numerous stone pagodas reminiscent of the ones at Tapsa Temple. In total, there are…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Jukrimsa Temple – 죽림사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Jukrimsa Temple in Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do, which shouldn’t be confused with the numerous other temples with the exact same name, is situated to the north of Mt. Namsan (851.7 m). It’s believed that Jukrimsa Temple was first founded in 610 A.D. by the monk Beopjeong. Initially, the temple was known as Hwanamsa Temple. Purportedly after Beopjeong founded Hwanamsa Temple, he travelled to Japan as directed by Queen Seondeok of Silla (r. 632-647 A.D.). As a result of his efforts, and upon his return to Silla, Beopjeong was rewarded with land next to Hwanamsa Temple. And because there was so much bamboo on this land, the name of the temple…

  • Busan

    Geumsusa Temple – 금수사 (Dong-gu, Busan)

    Temple History Geumsusa Temple, which means “Golden Water Temple” in English, is located in Dong-gu, Busan overlooking the port of Busan in the southern foothills of Mt. Gubongsan (404.5 m). Geumsusa Temple is most famous for being the headquarters of the Wonhyo Sect of Korean Buddhism. Also, it’s one of the 973 traditional Buddhist temples in Korea. At the end of the Imjin War (1592-98), and in 1604, Samyeong-daesa (1544-1610) went to Japan to negotiate the return of Korean prisoners of war. At that time, Samyeong-daesa stayed in Busan near the port. When he tasted the water there, he looked around the area and thought that it would be a…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Jinbulsa Temple – 진불사 (Pohang, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Jinbulsa Temple is located to the west of Mt. Gonggaesan (213.7 m) in eastern Pohang, Gyeongsangbuk-do near the East Sea. Jinbulsa Temple was purportedly first founded during the Silla Dynasty (57 B.C. – 935 A.D.). It’s said that it was later destroyed by a landslide during the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). It would be rebuilt in 1912. Additionally, Jinbulsa Temple belongs to the Taego-jong Order, which is the second largest Buddhist sect in Korea. It’s also one of the 973 traditional temples in Korea. Temple Layout Jinbulsa Temple is a smaller sized temple with a peculiar feel to it. With only a handful of shrine halls, Jinbulsa Temple is…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Sudasa Temple – 수다사 (Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Sudasa Temple is located in northwestern Gumi, Gyeongsangbuk-do in the southern foothills of Mt. Giyangsan (704.7 m). It’s believed that the temple was first founded by the monk Jingam-guksa (774-850 A.D.), during the reign of King Munseong of Silla (839-857 A.D.), after he saw a white lotus flowering on Mibong Peak. As a result, the temple was originally called Yeonhwasa Temple, which means “Lotus Flower Temple” in English. Eventually, the temple would be destroyed by fire in 976 A.D. only to be rebuilt in 1185 by the monk Gakwon-daesa. In 1273, the temple was destroyed, once more, but this time by floods. And in 1572, the temple was…

  • Busan

    Cheokpanam Hermitage – 척판암 (Gijang-gun, Busan)

    Hermitage History Cheokpanam Hermitage is located to the south of Mt. Bulgwangsan (350.3 m) in northeastern Gijang-gun, Busan. Cheokpanam Hermitage is located on the Jangansa Temple grounds. Cheokpanam Hermitage was first founded in 673 A.D. by the famed monk Wonhyo-daesa (617-686 A.D.). Initially, the temple was known as Damunsa Temple. According to a legend written in the “Songgoseungjeon – 僧傳 宋,” there were 1,000 Chinese monks worshiping at Taehwasa Temple in Tang China (618–690, 705–907 A.D.). They were in danger of being buried at the temple because of torrential rain and the potential for a landslide. Upon realizing this, and as Wonhyo-daesa was putting his hands together during a pre-ceremony, he saw…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Myeongjeokam Hermitage – 명적암 (Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Hermitage History Myeongjeokam Hermitage is located on the Jikjisa Temple grounds in Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbuk-do. The hermitage is beautifully located to the east of Mt. Hwangaksan (1,111.3 m), and to the west of Jikjisa Temple. It’s unclear when the hermitage was first founded. Myeongjeokam Hermitage is one of seven hermitages on the Jikjisa Temple grounds. Hermitage Layout To get to Myeongjeokam Hermitage from Jikjisa Temple, you’ll need to follow one of several hermitage roads, until it breaks-off into the road that leads up to Myeongjeokam Hermitage. Finally, you’ll find a path that is shaded by rows of mature trees. Eventually, a crowning two-story pavilion will appear. This is the first indication…

  • Gyeongsangbuk-do

    Daejeoksa Temple – 대적사 (Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do)

    Temple History Daejeoksa Temple is located in northern Cheongdo, Gyeongsangbuk-do to the west of Mt. Ansan (501.7 m). Daejeoksa Temple was first founded in 876 A.D. by the monk Bojo Chejing (804-880 A.D.), who shouldn’t be confused with the more famous Bojo-guksa (1158-1210). The temple was later rebuilt by the monk Boyang during the early part of the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). Daejeoksa Temple would eventually be destroyed by fire during the Imjin War (1592-98) in 1592. The temple was extensively repaired by the monk Seonghae in 1689. The temple would be repaired, again, in 1754 and 1939. And more recently, and starting in the 1970s, Daejeoksa Temple has undergone repairs…